Próximos Eventos

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Diálogos en Filosofía y Tecnología Seminario de investigación VII (16/17 de marzo de 2022) Andrew Feenberg: Sentido y Existencia

  Andrew Feenberg: Sentido y Existencia En diálogo con Yuk Hui   Miércoles, 16 de marzo de 2022, 6pm-8pm PST Jueves, 17 de marzo de 2022, 9-11am HKT Evento en línea: Regístrese para participar a través de Zoom https://bit.ly/3siwoSK Evento en Facebook: https://fb.me/e/35lCCKiWm   Vivimos en dos mundos, un mundo objetivo de hechos y un

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Diálogos en Filosofía y Tecnología Seminario de investigación VIII (27 abril 2022) Luciana Parisi: Instrumentalidad y posibilidad

Dialogues in Philosophy and Technology Research Seminar VIII

Luciana Parisi: Instrumentality and Possibility
In dialogue with Yuk Hui

Wed, 27 April 2022
9pm-11pm HKT / 9am-11am EST

Online Event: Register to join via Zoom
Facebook Event: https://fb.me/e/1zV8AEyy5

In this seminar, Luciana Parisi will discuss instrumentality and possibility in relation to computational systems. The talk will be followed by a dialogue with Yuk Hui.

Instrumentality generally defines a correlation between means and ends and can be set up to question the correlation between technology and philosophy. This talk will address instrumentality in terms of the critique of instrumental reason and its legacy in contemporary discussions on intelligent automation in the context of global computational capital. By drawing on American pragmatism, this talk proposes a notion of instrumentality that refuses the equation of the medium with thinking and of the datum with the ideatum. Instrumentality can rather offer alternatives for dialogues on philosophy and technology. The crisis of transcendental reason that returns in the computational configurations of racial capitalism (the extraction/abstraction of the flesh, land, water, oil, cognitive, creative, and social labour in algorithmic rules and data infrastructures) becomes a radical possibility for hacking the equation of instrumental reason at the core of Western metaphysics. As much as the myth of Prometheus appears to intensify the global speciation of knowledge – where the gendering, racializing and sexualizing conditions of knowing are recursively repeated across culture – so too do intelligent automation falls short of fulfilling the universality of the manifest image of man: the mismatch between thoughts and means can no longer be repaired.

Luciana Parisi is a Professor at the Program in Literature and Computational Media Art and Culture at Duke University. Her research is a philosophical investigation of technology in culture, aesthetics and politics. She was a member of the CCRU (Cybernetic Culture Research Unit) and currently a co-founding member of CCB (Critical Computation Bureau). She is the author of Abstract Sex: Philosophy, Biotechnology and the Mutations of Desire (2004, Continuum Press) and Contagious Architecture. Computation, Aesthetics and Space (2013, MIT Press). She is completing a monograph on alien epistemologies and the transformation of logical thinking in computation.

About the series

The Dialogues on Philosophy and Technology seminar series is initiated by the Cosmotechnics/Critical AI research project, supported by the City University of Hong Kong in collaboration with the Research Network for Philosophy and Technology. The series running from Fall/Spring 2021/22 features talks and workshops with leading scholars in the philosophy of technology and aims to address urgent questions on philosophy and technology today.

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Diálogos en Filosofía y Tecnología Seminario de investigación VII (16/17 de marzo de 2022) Andrew Feenberg: Sentido y Existencia

 

Andrew Feenberg: Sentido y Existencia

En diálogo con Yuk Hui

 

Miércoles, 16 de marzo de 2022, 6pm-8pm PST
Jueves, 17 de marzo de 2022, 9-11am HKT

Evento en línea: Regístrese para participar a través de Zoom https://bit.ly/3siwoSK
Evento en Facebook: https://fb.me/e/35lCCKiWm

 

Vivimos en dos mundos, un mundo objetivo de hechos y un mundo vivido en el que estamos activamente actuando con el estado de las cosas. Estos dos mundos no pueden resolverse en una sola realidad, pero se comunican constantemente. En esta charla hablaré de las interacciones entre ambos que dan forma a la ciencia y la tecnología.

Andrew Feenberg es profesor emérito de la Facultad de Comunicación de la Universidad Simon Fraser, donde dirigió el Laboratorio de Comunicación y Tecnología Aplicadas. Fue director de programa en el Collège International de Philosophie de París entre 2013 y 2019. Entre sus libros se encuentran Questioning Technology, Transforming Technology, Heidegger and Marcuse, Between Reason and Experience, The Philosophy of Praxis y Technosystem: The Social Life of Reason (La vida social de la razón). Su próximo libro sobre Herbert Marcuse aparecerá en Verso este año.

 

Sobre la serie

La serie de seminarios Diálogos sobre Filosofía y Tecnología está iniciada por el proyecto de investigación Cosmotechnics/Critical AI, apoyado por la City University of Hong Kong en colaboración con la Research Network for Philosophy and Technology. La serie, que se desarrollará a partir de otoño/primavera de 2021/22, incluye charlas y talleres con destacados especialistas en filosofía de la tecnología y pretende abordar cuestiones urgentes sobre la filosofía y la tecnología en la actualidad.

Los próximos eventos incluyen seminarios en 2022 con Luciana Parisi (20 de abril), y Carl Mitcham (25 de mayo). Sigue nuestra página de Facebook o suscríbete a nuestro newsletter para estar al día de los próximos eventos.

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Conversación de libros (10/11 de marzo de 2022) Datos discriminatorios por Wendy Chun

 

Book Conversation: Discriminating Data by Wendy Chun

In dialogue with Yuk Hui

 

Thu 10 March 2022, 5pm PST / Fri 11 March 2022, 9am HKT

Online Event: Register to join via Zoom

Facebook Event: https://fb.me/e/304BhrtRH

 

In this event, Wendy Chun will discuss her latest book Discriminating Data (2021, MIT Press) in conversation with Yuk Hui.

In Discriminating Data, Chun reveals how polarization is a goal—not an error—within big data and machine learning. These methods, she argues, encode segregation, eugenics, and identity politics through their default assumptions and conditions. Correlation, which grounds big data’s predictive potential, stems from twentieth-century eugenic attempts to “breed” a better future. Recommender systems foster angry clusters of sameness through homophily. Users are “trained” to become authentically predictable via a politics and technology of recognition. Machine learning and data analytics thus seek to disrupt the future by making disruption impossible.

Chun, who has a background in systems design engineering as well as media studies and cultural theory, explains that although machine learning algorithms may not officially include race as a category, they embed whiteness as a default. Facial recognition technology, for example, relies on the faces of Hollywood celebrities and university undergraduates—groups not famous for their diversity. Homophily emerged as a concept to describe white U.S. resident attitudes to living in biracial yet segregated public housing. Predictive policing technology deploys models trained on studies of predominantly underserved neighbourhoods. Trained on selected and often discriminatory or dirty data, these algorithms are only validated if they mirror this data.

How can we release ourselves from the vice-like grip of discriminatory data? Chun calls for alternative algorithms, defaults, and interdisciplinary coalitions in order to desegregate networks and foster a more democratic big data.

 

Wendy Hui Kyong Chun is Canada 150 Research Chair in New Media in the School of Communication, and Director of the Digital Democracies Institute at Simon Fraser University. She has studied both Systems Design Engineering and English Literature, which she combines and mutates in her current work on digital media. She is author of Control and Freedom: Power and Paranoia in the Age of Fiber Optics (MIT, 2006), Programmed Visions: Software and Memory (MIT 2011), Updating to Remain the Same: Habitual New Media (MIT 2016), and Discriminating Data (2021, MIT Press), and co-author of Pattern Discrimination (University of Minnesota + Meson Press 2019). She has been Professor and Chair of the Department of Modern Culture and Media at Brown University, where she worked for almost two decades and where she’s currently a Visiting Professor.

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Seminario de Investigación Diálogos en Filosofía y Tecnología VI (22 de febrero de 2022) Henning Schmidgen: Normatividad maquínica

Henning Schmidgen: Machinic Normativity
In dialogue with Yuk Hui

Tuesday, 22 February 2022
13:00-15:00 CET / 20:00-22:00 HKT
Online Event: Register to join via Zoom
Facebook Event

In today’s society, technologies are often perceived as helpful and fruitful “modes of existence” that facilitate and improve the lives of their users. At the same time, they are often experienced as limitations and constraints imposed on us by more or less abstract bodies and powers. The use of digital technologies, in particular, is often associated with unclear rules, preconditions, and consequences that limit our capacities for self-determination – and thus also the possibility of normative action. In this situation, it is not only the critique of algorithms, artificial intelligence, and information capitalism that is appropriate and necessary. As I argue, what is also at stake is an extended reflection about “machinic normativity,” i.e., the possibility and capacity for subjective and creative use of technologies.

This talk introduces the idea of machinic normativity by referring to the philosophical tradition of what Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari have called “technological vitalism.” I will show that this tradition includes not just Deleuze and Guattari, but also philosophers and physicians such as Georges Canguilhem and Kurt Goldstein. Crucial to this tradition is a biological perspective on “technique” in which it is understood as synonymous with the possibility of shaping one’s environment. Accordingly, our answer to the question concerning technology depends crucially on actualizing this perspective.

Henning Schmidgen is Professor of Media Studies at the Bauhaus University in Weimar, Germany. He studied psychology, philosophy and linguistics in Berlin and Paris. In 1996, he obtained his PhD in psychology at the Free University Berlin. From 1997 to 2011, he was postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science (Dept. Rheinberger) in Berlin. In 2011, he obtained the Habilitation in history of science and media studies. Between 2011 and 2014 he was professor of media aesthetics at the University of Regensburg.

Bridging the gap between media studies and the history of science, Schmidgen worked extensively on Guattari’s machines, Canguilhem’s concepts, and the problem of time in physiology, psychology, and psychoanalysis. His research is published by journals such as Isis, Configurations, and Grey Room. Among his recent books are The Helmholtz-Curves. Tracing Lost Time (2014), The Guattari Tapes (2019) and Horn, or The Counterside of Media (2022).

About the series

The Dialogues on Philosophy and Technology seminar series is initiated by the Cosmotechnics/Critical AI research project, supported by the City University of Hong Kong in collaboration with the Research Network for Philosophy and Technology. The series running from Fall/Spring 2021/22 features talks and workshops with leading scholars in the philosophy of technology and aims to address urgent questions on philosophy and technology today.

Upcoming events include seminars in 2022 with Andrew Feenberg (16 March), Luciana Parisi (20 April), and Carl Mitcham (25 May). Follow our Facebook Page or sign-up to our newsletter to stay up-to-date on upcoming events.